Appalachian Spring Wildflowers: Part 1

Some photos from a few different walks in the woods in April. Jack-in-the-pulpit, more spring beauty, trillium, fleabane, more ragwort, dutchman’s breeches, tons of violets, and a beautiful swallowtail I encountered on the trail one evening.

Jack-in-the-Pulpit
Dutchman’s Breeches

Soft mornings

There is magic in quiet mornings. Mary Oliver sums it up in one of my favorite poems, ‘Softest of Mornings’. (Okay, every poem Mary Oliver ever wrote is my favorite…)

Softest of mornings, hello.
And what will you do today, I wonder,
to my heart?
And how much honey can the heart stand, I wonder,
before it must break?

This is trivial, or nothing: a snail
climbing a trellis of leaves
and the blue trumpets of flowers.

No doubt clocks are ticking loudly
all over the world.
I don’t hear them. The snail’s pale horns
extend and wave this way and that
as her fingers-body shuffles forward, leaving behind
the silvery path of her slime.

Oh, softest of mornings, how shall I break this?
How shall I move away from the snail, and the flowers?
How shall I go on, with my introspective and ambitious life?

FOTD – January 26th

This isn’t a flower, but, damnit, 2020 was weird (!!!), so here is a sweet lil green reminder that spring is coming soon enough. I am literally having trouble waiting for all of the sweet Appalachian wildflowers to start blooming in these mountains. The first sign of bloodroot on the trail and I’m going to absolutely lose it. Aside from daffodils popping up in random places, the bloodroot is my favorite spring harbinger.

One thing that’s going to help me pass the time between now and the sweet bloodroots popping up: I’ve signed up for a super interesting 6 week photography workshop. There will be weekly assignments, discussions, and feedback. It’s a collaboration workshop based on an exhibit put on by a local art museum here and the Whitney Museum of American Art in NY, NY. It focuses on the power of narrative in photography, and I am looking forward to learning a lot and meeting some really amazing photographers. πŸ™‚

I’m spending a lot of time looking at old pics of sweet summer flowers and lush green landscapes. After I post here, I’m going to spend a few hours doing crafts in the sunshine. January/February are always a little tough because we get these teaser 70 degree weather days. Guess I better go out and enjoy it. πŸ™‚

Posting as part of Cee’s Flower of the Day Challenge. πŸ™‚

Newry Mill

An unexpected day off last week led to exploring an abandoned mill in South Carolina. I was alone, and it was too spooky to go inside, but hopefully I’ll go back soon on a sunny day to check out the inside.

Mulatu of Asheville

Global pandemic aside, 2020 has been a hell of a year. To add to the craziness, the new hobbies, the personal growth ventures and goals, and the challenges, I decided to adopt a cat! Meet Mulatu. He found me at a “cat cafe” in Brevard, NC. I named him after an Ethiojazz artist I’m really fond of. His name means “complete” or “full”, and like Mulatu Astatke, kitty Mulatu jumped around quite a bit before finding where he needs to be. Welcome home, Mulatu.

Enjoy the cute kitty pics! πŸ™‚